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Spiritual Temperaments- Traditionalism (3 of 9)

April 15, 2010

He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me." Luke 22:19

In his helpful book on nine different kinds of spiritual temperament – Sacred Pathways, Christian author Gary Thomas describes a third category of people whom he calls: Traditionalists. He writes: 

‘Traditionalists are fed by…the historic dimensions of faith: rituals, symbols, sacraments, and sacrifice. These people tend to have a disciplined life of faith. Some may be seen by others as legalists, defining their faith largely by matters of conduct…Traditionalists have a need for ritual and structure. The contemplative’s unstructured “prayer of the quiet” would be confusing and fairly un-fulfilling to them.’ (Page 24) 

Thomas identifies 3 distinct aspects to the traditionalist way of life: 

  1. Ritual (or liturgical pattern)
  2. Symbol (or significant image)
  3. Sacrifice

The three different facets of the traditionalist approach are physical ways of representing spiritual realities. (Page 73) 

A resurgence of interest in traditionalist spirituality can be found in the recent popularity of Celtic spirituality, New Monasticism and the Rule of Benedict. The Northumbria Community are one example of a contemporary community that practices and encourages associate members to regularly pray the Office during the day. They divide each day by stopping, recollecting and praying at specific times – morning (matins), noon, evening and Compline. These prayer times are practised together at their community house in Northumbria, but associates also follow this rule, wherever they may be in the world by using the Northumbria Community’s Prayer Book and guided readings – Celtic Daily Prayer. 

The Rule of Benedict , is a  medieval book written by Saint Benedict of thoughts and guidance on the monastic life that has influenced most religious orders in Western Europe. It has received popular interest due to the 2005 television programme The Monastery, which followed three nonreligious men in their thirties and one older retired man experiencing a month long retreat at the Benedictine monastery Worth Abbey in England. 

A helpful book inspired by the Abbot of Worth Abbey’s experiences with guiding nonreligious people through retreat at the monastery is Finding Sanctuary – Monastic Steps for Everyday Life. Abbot Christopher Jamison refers to many modern peoples’ frustration and disasitisfaction at their lives being so busy. He then sets out seven monastic steps based on the Rule of Benedict which he believes can help the modern person remedy the busy distraction of their contemporary lives. They are: 

  1. Silence
  2. Contemplation
  3. Obedience
  4. Humility
  5. Community
  6. Spirituality
  7. Hope 

  

Thomas in his book provides helpful questions to discern whether you are a traditionalist. Giving yourself a grade between 5 and 1 for each question – five being very true and one being not true at all.

  1. I sense God most intimately when I take part in a style of worship that returns me to childhood memories. Traditions and rituals touch my soul more than anything else.
  2. I believe that an emphasis on individual self-expression within the church can be detrimental to peoples’ spiritual well-being. Christianity is about being part of a community and therefore our faith should be expressed as corporate worship.
  3. Tradition and history are both words that appeal to me.
  4. I would enjoy taking part in a formal liturgy or prayer-book service. I like to remind myself of my beliefs and spiritual loyalties by placing symbols in my car, house and workplace. I also feel that the religious calendar is important for me and my family. I like to follow the different seasons and celebrations of my faith throughout the year.
  5. A book such as Celtic Daily Prayer would interest me.
  6. I enjoy developing my own personal daily rituals for prayer, meditation, study, and spending time alone or with friends.

  

Once again the higher the score the more your temperament fits the traditionalist description.  

(Sacred Pathways, page 92-3) 

http://www.cloistersonline.com 

http://www.northumbriacommunity.org/ 

http://www.findingsanctuary.org/index.htm 

http://www.worthabbey.net/bbc/

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One comment

  1. I have recently returned to a traditional way of worship and am surprised to find that I am comfortable with this. Perhaps we sometimes need to retreat to a more introverted place to worship quietly and honestly. Just so long as we take our faith out into the world and put it into action there. I became tired of pressure to ‘evangelise’ when what was really intended was effort to persuade friends and people we know to go to church. This might be ok but there is also the risk that they may question our real interest in them as individuals.



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